JAC NEWS

■ 2014.09.30

A women students' expedition team successfully scales Mt. Mansail in Mustang, Nepal, for the first time on September 29

A women students' expedition team successfully scales Mt. Mansail in Mustang, Nepal, for the first time on September 29

 

A women students’ expedition team of the Japanese Alpine Club (JAC) succeeded in scaling the thus-far-unexplored 6,242-meter-high Mt. Mansail in the Mustang Himal in Nepal on Monday, September 29, the expedition team reported to the JAC in Tokyo the same evening.

 

According to the team’s report via satellite telephone from the Camp 2, the team reached the peak at 1 p.m. local time (4:15 p.m. in Japan) on September 29 for the first time ever. The mountain was opened for climbing for the first time this year.

 

It was snowing steadily when they reached the rocky peak from the north side of the mountain. It was clear when they left C2 at 5,684 meters on September 25 but began snowing on their way, according to the report.

 

Those who achieved the feat are: Yukiko Inoue, leader of the expedition team (senior, Musashino University, Tokyo); Eri Hasegawa (22, senior, Soka University, Tokyo); Mariko Nakamura (22, senior, Tsukuba University, Ibaraki Prefecture); and Kei Taniguchi, 42, who accompanied them as adviser.

 

The student climbers are all members of the JAC’s Students Division. Another member of the team, Kaho Mishima (21, junior, Hirosaki University) who had been in a Kathmandu hospital since she arrived there, arrived at the Base Camp at 4,888 meters to join the team, according to the report.

 

They canceled the plan to scale two other peaks in the area, Mt. Mansail South (6,251 meters) and Mt. Mustang Himal (6,195 meters), because of the heavy snow. They returned to C2 at 5:15 p.m. local time Monday.

 

The team, which left Japan on September 5, is expected to return to Kathmandu on October 10, and will return home on October 13.

 

The JAC’s Student Division has sent four expedition teams during the past 10 years to scale then unexplored 6,000-plus-meter-high peaks.